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I receive Medicaid. What do I do when…?

If you receive a letter about your “Long Term Services,” it is usually referring to your Medicaid-funded Waiver and / or Community First Choice services. 

If the letter asks you to complete an application or provide certain information, you should respond within the timeframe given. If you do not, you risk losing both Medicaid and the services you receive through Medicaid, which might include personal care, employment support, therapies, and other services.

If you receive a letter about your “Long Term Services,” it is usually referring to your Medicaid-funded Waiver and / or Community First Choice services. 

If the letter asks you to complete an application or provide certain information, you should respond within the timeframe given. If you do not, you risk losing both Medicaid and the services you receive through Medicaid, which might include personal care, employment support, therapies, and other services.

People can lose SSI for many reasons. For example, if you are over $2,000 in resources, or you begin receiving a larger Social Security Title II cash benefit, you might lose your SSI cash benefit for at least one month or longer. 

Depending on the reason you lose SSI eligibility, you may be at risk of losing your Medicaid. 

In this situation, the State will ask you to reapply for Medicaid to see if you qualify for Medicaid through a different eligibility pathway. This process is called a Medicaid “redetermination.”

Visit Medicaid Pathways for more information about some of the common Medicaid Pathways available.

When using Medicaid to pay for your long-term support, depending on your living situation and your Medicaid eligibility pathway, you may be required to “participate” or pay toward the cost of your care. If this applies to you, you could be spending a lot of your monthly income toward “Participation.”

If you are paying toward your cost of care, or if you have questions and want to learn more, we recommend you speak with a Benefits Planner. You may be able to move to a different Medicaid pathway and no longer pay for Participation. A Benefits Planner can help identify other Medicaid pathways available to you which do not require Participation.

If you stop working, you should report this change to an HWD specialist. 

With HWD, you have an annual review date when the State determines if you are still eligible for the program.

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If you need support, you may want to talk with a benefits planner. You can visit the Get Help page for a list of benefits planners who may be able to help.

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